Absolute Zero Temperature is

  • 0oC
  • 0K
  • 0oF
  • -273oC
Monis Rasool Professor Asked on 7th May 2015 in Physics.
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     -273oC  is the Absolute Zero Temperature .

    RE: Absolute Zero Temperature is

    Absolute zero is the lower limit of the thermodynamic temperature scale, a state at which the enthalpy and entropy of a cooled ideal gas reaches its minimum value, taken as 0. The theoretical temperature is determined by extrapolating the ideal gas law; by international agreement, absolute zero is taken as −273.15° on the Celsius scale (International System of Units), which equates to −459.67° on the Fahrenheit scale (United States customary units). The corresponding Kelvin and Rankine temperature scales set their zero points at absolute zero by definition.

    It is commonly thought of as the lowest temperature possible, but it is not the lowest enthalpy state possible, because all real substances begin to depart from the ideal gas when cooled as they approach the change of state to liquid, and then to solid; and the sum of the enthalpy of vaporization (gas to liquid) and enthalpy of fusion (liquid to solid) exceeds the ideal gas’s change in enthalpy to absolute zero. In the quantum-mechanical description, matter (solid) at absolute zero is in its ground state, the point of lowest internal energy.

    Harsh Vardhan Professor Answered on 7th May 2015.
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